Affordable Glock Braces: Micro Roni vs. RT 20/20

Quick! What’s the most customizable handgun on the market? 

You could argue it’s the 1911 but…I’d hazard to say Glock pistols beat out most handguns when it comes to customizing.  

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 side by side
CAA Micro Roni (top) and Recover Tactical 20/20 (bottom)

Glock, Glock, Glock — I know it’s easy to get sick of hearing all about Glock. They are a platform that can’t be ignored.

A dominant force.

The series is in use by every type of user. Cops, military members, and your every day, Dick and Jane carry Glocks.

A benefit to this, though, is a massive aftermarket. Upgrades range from sights, triggers, and even weird subgun-esque brace kits.

And today our focus is on these brace kits. 

Off the top of my head, I can think of close to half a dozen different models. We have the Kidon, the KPOS, The Flux, the Hera kits, the CAA Micro Roni, and the newest model, the Recover Tactical 20/20 brace system.

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 side by side
CAA Micro Roni (top) and Recover Tactical 20/20 (bottom)

The KPOS, Flux, Hera, and even the Kidon kits are quite expensive, but the Roni and 20/20 are downright affordable

Seeing as how I have both, I decided to take a look at them in detail to see which is the best.

Buckle up, because in this article we are going to compare and contrast the Gen 4 Micro Roni and the Recover Tactical 20/20. Ultimately, we’re going to get to the bottom of which is superior.

Table of Contents

Loading...

What the Heck Are These Things? 

If you are new to turning Glocks into much bigger pistol platforms, then the confusion might be palpable.

These kits are simple, though.

Clamping on or around a Glock, they turn your small pistol into a much larger pistol — often making it the size of a subgun style pistol like an SP5, Scorpion, etc.

To many, these kits are somewhat silly. And I get that.

They are more of a fun novelty with very niche practical use. 

micro roni front grip
Sub gun? Or tricked out Glock?

The majority of come from Israel, and there’s a reason for that. 

Israel’s gun laws make it harder to get semi-auto rifles than pistols. Israel initially made these kits with stocks — not braces — for use in Israel.

They don’t have SBR laws, so attaching a stock to their Glock isn’t an issue. 

Roni and RT 20/20 rails
CAA Micro Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20

Because America is America, we love customization! Gun laws….not so much.

It’s a hefty requirement to pay $200 for a true SBR. Let’s not forget the paperwork. All to finally be allowed to toss a stock on your pistol.

And that, kids, is why we love pistol braces.

Want to dive into the history of pistol braces and the ATF? Check out our article explaining it all.

230
at OpticsPlanet

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Manufacturers are happy to tap into that and provide braced variants of these products.

The Micro Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 are two such Israeli-invented items that have made their way to American shores. 

They are mighty similar, but also quite different in their approaches.

180
at Sportsman's Guide

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Right now, I’ll tell you both are pretty neat and well made. They both provide a braced option for your Glock pistol, and neither has any crazy issue that immediately disqualifies it. 

Overall Specs 

The Recover Tactical 20/20 is a more minimalistic design that keeps things a good bit lighter.

The Micro Roni system makes your Glock longer in both directions and features a full-on shell that wraps around the gun.

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20
CAA Micro Roni Gen 4 (left) and Recover Tactical 20/20 (right)

Weight-wise, the RT 20/20 weighs 1-pound in its base level configuration.

Meanwhile, the Micro Roni weighs 2.5-pounds.

The RT 20/20 is also about 3.4-inches shorter, and overall, it’s a lot slimmer. 

Recover Tactical 20/20
Recover Tactical 20/20

There are three variations of the Roni: the Micro, the MCK, and the standard Roni system.

The Micro Roni will fit the full-size and compact Glocks in the standard frame configuration. This means Glock 17, 19, 22, 23, and the .357 SIG and .45 GAP guns.

Users only have to adjust the compensator forward or rearward to accommodate different slide lengths. 

Roni Micro brace
CAA Micro Roni Gen 4 brace

Your standard Roni will fit the same guns, but will also accommodate the Glock 17L and weird format Glocks like a 34 slide on a 17 frame. 

If big-bore Glock 21 and 20 models are your favorite flavor, you’ll want to make sure you get the MCK designed just for these.

Sadly, no such option exists for the RT 20/20 just yet. 

Installation 

Let’s talk about how to put these dang things on! At first glance, they can look a little complicated, but I assure you — they’re not.

First up: The Micro Roni.

This brace features a quick drop-in installation that requires zero tools or changes to your Glock platform.

Simply open the bottom hatch of the Roni, attach the Glock to the integral charging handle, and push the Glock forward, locking it into the brace.

Roni brace and Glock
Installing the Micro Roni

Boom, easy! 

The Recover Tactical 20/20 has a more involved installation that requires the use of an Allen wrench to remove a bolt to install/remove the Glock.

You have to remove the bolt, ensure the brace is unlocked, and then install the Glock into the device. 

Recover Tactical 20/20 Brace and Glock
Installing the Recover Tactical 20/20

It’s less simple, but still pretty effective.

I also appreciate that the Recover Tactical 20/20 comes with two optional charging handles: a low and a high charging handle.

While they are optional, it’s tough to easily use the RT 20/20 without them. Installation requires a smaller Allen wrench and can be a minor hassle. 

Overall, I prefer the installation of the Micro Roni over the Recover Tactical. It’s simple, and the drop-in design is rather nice. The tool-based design of the RT 20/20 isn’t a big pain in the bum, but I like to minimize the need for tools when possible. 

Customization 

When it comes to customization between brace styles, the competition is not necessarily fair.

It’s like watching Star Wars and Star Trek. Sure, they are similar in many ways, but also vastly different. 

Roni and RT 20/20 rails
The Roni offers A LOT more rail space!

Roni’s customization comes from the shell itself. The large shell allows you to install lights, lasers, and optics.

The massive scope rail at the top leaves room for anything from red dots to LPVOs or tacked on NVG monoculars and magnifiers. 

Side rails allow for lights and lasers, and there is a slot for a specially made integral flashlight should you choose it. 

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 muzzle end
No side rails on the RT 20/20

The Micro Roni also doesn’t impede the use of aftermarket frame upgrades. New triggers, safeties, and slide releases all remain in play. There is also an additional integral magazine attachment, but according to the YRS website, this classifies the Roni as an “any other weapon.” 

On the other hand, the RT 20/20 allows you to use all of your frame upgrades as well as all your slide upgrades.

This includes mounted mini red dots, threaded barrels with suppressors or compensators, as well as night sights, and whatever other doodads you choose to attach. 

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20
Micro Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20

The RT 20/20 also sports side rails, as well as a button rail for attaching accessories. While it’s not released yet, there is an upcoming optics mount that will bolt to the side of the brace and allow for the mounting of full-sized red dots. 

Being able to toss on a suppressor is a big plus for guys who love their cans. I imagine it makes the platform compact and quiet. 

RT 2020 with Forward Grip
RT 20/20 with Forward Grip

What I like about the RT 20/20 is that it’s quite modular, and Recover Tactical is releasing various upgrades to the system.

This includes a forward magazine mount that is not a grip, the aforementioned optic mount, and even a stock for those who choose to go full SBR with it. 

The RT 20/20 also has a holster setup that allows you to completely cover the trigger and carry safely.

180
at Sportsman's Guide

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

It uses the IWI style roto pattern, and there is a number of aftermarket options to change the configuration of the holster. The platform is small and light enough that it’s not a hassle to carry via holster, but don’t expect to concealed carry this thing. 

Ergonomics 

Both of these kits make it rather difficult to use the slide lock with a single hand. They hover above it, leaving very little room for my sausage fingers to work. For reloads, stick to the charging handle. Locking the slide to the rear — get used to using two hands. 

Neither system will work with a left-hand slide release either…so, sorry, lefties. 

Bubba Lefty Build
At least it’s not this bad?

The Micro Roni’s larger size gives you enough room to rest your hand forward of your firing hand. There is an angled grip integrated into the frame that offers a more subgun style grip to it.

Conversely, the RT 20/20’s design has you holding the Glock…like a Glock. 

A Micro Roni uses an ambidextrous charging handle and it’s an Uncanny Valley version of an AR-15 charging handle.

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 side by side
Charging handle on the Roni, overhang on the RT 20/20

As expected, it reciprocates with the slide. However, the positioning doesn’t create any issues. 

The RT 20/20 has a huge overhang that accommodates the length of the Glock slide reciprocating, and this protects you and the gun. Without it, something may strike or interfere with the slide as you fire the gun. 

230
at OpticsPlanet

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

The addition of a charging handle makes it easy to grip and rip the slide, and I imagine if a malfunction occurred, the charging handle would make it easier to clear.

The open-top design means you don’t have a minimized ejection port, and this type of design makes clearing a failure to eject easier. 

Roni and RT 20/20 folded
Micro Roni and RT 20/20 folded

Brace Design

These are pistol braces, and the design of a pistol brace is meant to be strapped to your forearm to better stabilize the pistol.

Regardless of how you use them, the main purpose is to be a brace. 

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 braces side by side
Micro Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 braces side by side

The Roni uses a soft rubber style brace similar to the SB Tactical designs with a velcro strap, Meanwhile, the RT 20/20 uses a hard brace curved to accommodate the arm, and there is a velcro strap to allow you to strap it on.

Both fit any forearm, but they do work a bit differently. 

With the RT 20/20, you can hold the Glock at various angles and the gun is easily manipulated. Unfortunately, the Micro Roni forces you to hold the gun at specific angles and is not as comfortable as the RT 20/20. 

Using the Roni brace
Using the Roni brace

Roni’s heavier design does ensure the recoil is absorbed, and the gun barely moves. However, you better bring a red dot because using AR-style peep sights is difficult with long eye relief.

The RT 20/20 allows you to use stock Glock sights, and that’s a lot more comfortable when braced outwards. 

Using the Recover Tactical 20/20 brace
Using the Recover Tactical 20/20 brace

The RT 20/20 also acts as a third arm on the Glock, which gives you excellent control over the gun. Pistol braces were initially designed for disabled shooters, and the RT 20/20 is perfect for that. It makes one-armed shooting nearly as stable as shooting with two arms. 

I found that the Micro Roni is a bit heavy for one-handed use. It’s not impossible, but not as comfortable as the RT 20/20. 

If you choose to misuse the brace in some weird way, I doubt you’d notice a major difference between the two. 

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 folded
Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 folded

Price

Oh man, here it is, what’s often the biggest deciding factor in purchases…the price. When it comes to goofy accessories, I prefer to spend less money than more.

So what’s cheaper? 

But not that much of it.

Well, the RT 20/20 can be had for about $100 for the base model. There are various tiers in which accessories are added.

This includes the addition of optional rails, the holster, a sling, optics mount, etc., as the tiers increase as does the price. 

Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20
Big difference in looks, big difference in price!

However, even the top tier is still cheaper than the Micro Roni.

The Roni varies in price depending on accessories, but the base model is around $250. You get a lot more shell with the Roni, and the ability to handle it more like a subgun and less like a pistol. 

230
at OpticsPlanet

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Conclusion

Both the Micro Roni and Recover Tactical 20/20 have similar goals of turning a Glock pistol into a subgun, but they offer different methods to arrive there.

My personal preference? The RT 20/20. Though it provides less room to customize, it’s lighter, smaller, and more handgun-like.

180
at Sportsman's Guide

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

The RT 20/20’s price is also a huge selling point for most people.

With that said, I do like the Micro Roni’s tool-free installation. It’s a nice perk, especially if you like simple and easy.

Roni and RT 20/20 rails
And one last closeup!

Which is for you? Or have you tried different models with the same concept? Let us know and tell us what you think. You might also want to mosey on over to our list of the Best Glocks, too!

The Best Gun Deals, Coupons and Finds

Subscribe to Pew Pew Tactical's sales and deals email.

16 Leave a Reply

  • EC

    I have tried a lot of the conversion units for Glocks. KPOS, Roni, SIG ACP over the past 10 years You can get the RT now for about 80 bucks---the key thing is that new accessory which is over the top mount which is a rail for fixed optics---pretty useless unless you have that. The RT is more akin to the brace stocks available for it rather than a RONI---I currently have both and when I want to carry it as a defensive pdw type---i grab it-if i want extensive shooting time then Roni it is.. I have my RT rigged in a modified UZI drop down holster ala invasion USA shooting type---its comforted me a lot during the riot times this past summer and is easy carry now its winter as well A great thing about the RT and RONI as well as others as if traveling then only need one gun---regular pistol config to carry and then if shtf ---break out RT or RONI---your not carrying 2 guns and dont have to worry about securing one in trunk or wherever but have a longish gun type option

    3 days ago
  • Mark E

    I am not a Glock guy, but I do have an MCK Gen 4 for my CZ P-10C. I really enjoy shooting it, especially with a Viper Venom Red Dot. With the red dot, very small groupings at 25 yards was possible and I have no doubt that I will be able to punch out the X ring once I get the Venom zero'd. Mounting a red dot, a light and a laser turns my P-10C into a handly home defense weapon, should I choose to keep it mounted in the MCK frame (which I don't yet). Mine is a pretty tight fit so inserting the pistol and especially removing it was a PITA at first.

    4 days ago
  • Mike

    Good article. But as far as I know, you can't attach a fore grip onto a pistol. ATF says illegal on a AR pistol. Pretty sure it would be illegal here also. As was pointed out it is for someone with a disability.

    4 days ago
    • EC

      Not sure what your referring to but the magazine grip for the RT 20/20 is legal and does not make it a SBR---- 1--Its not vertical--its angled as akin to magpul AFG 2---Its designed as a mag holder and not a grip -----FLUX also makes a similar one

      3 days ago
    • Mark E

      Yeah, makes it an SBR. They point that out on the CAA site.

      4 days ago
  • Erwin Green

    I have the MCK for my S&W 9mm. Fun to shoot, but cleaning all the residue off the front after a range day can be a PITA.

    4 days ago
  • Robert J. Pettis

    I'm definitely a fan. Last year I had surgery on my primary hand due to a severe accident in my truck. Now it shakes almost uncontrollably. I'm trying to learn to shoot left handed but it's going slow for this old dawg. As soon as R/T makes one of these for the Polymer 80 I'm snatching one up. Great article!

    4 days ago
  • justacog

    It seems those glock braces create a length of pull over 13.5 inches which the ATF is buzzing about like a nest of angry hornets.

    4 days ago
  • Bob

    I bought the 20/20 early Dec from Bereli.com- $80 for the 20/20BT (Tan) plain Jane version, $20 added for the forward grip (also holds a spare mag). Really nice, tho I haven't shot it yet. For large frame Glocks in 10mm n 45, the 20/21 will be available soon, 1st qtr 2021.

    4 days ago
  • Yogi

    I thought I have seen every thing stupid in the world in my 80 plus years! But, pistol braces for hand guns are just plain STUPID! I heard once, a long time ago, you can fix nearly anything with duct tape except stupid. Guess what, duct tape can't fix these things!

    4 days ago
    • ec

      You are not a student of history then---its similar to the stocks dating back over 100 akin to the Broomhandle Mauser---ever wonder why they call it that?????---as well as the stocks on Lugers and Browning High powers and even longer history wise with attachments for Colt Navy and Single shot Naval handguns.---they make the handgun more controllable and accurate Overall they are in the market to as a near subsitute a SMG that is very difficult to obtain due to cost and legal constraints.

      3 days ago
    • Matthew Mcdurfee

      They also especially the Roni make the pistol less accurate with a plastic body that doesnt ensure proper lock up. I saw a guy shoot 5 inches off center at 15 yards with a red dot. I can keyhole the bullseye from that range all day with a real PCC AR9

      4 days ago
    • GomeznSA

      Yogi - sorry you feel that way. Remember that the original reason the pistol brace was invented was to make it easier or even possible for disabled folks to still be able to shoot a pistol. Glad all of your bits and pieces still work good enough that you don't need any help, like some of us do. IOW - it ain't 'stupid' if it makes it possible for someone to still be able to shoot.

      4 days ago
      • Matthew Mcdurfee

        Pistol braces yes, the roni not so much. Bad system, very inaccurate.

        4 days ago
  • BobF

    So, to be clear... the technical advantage of a rifle is better accuracy thanks to the longer barrel, right? The downside is, well, it's longer than a handgun. So these devices (I'd say I am on the side that considers them rather ridiculous) essentially add the length (and that oh-so-tacticool-flavor) while doing nothing whatever for accuracy. Hmmm - now I want to make my motorcycle look more like a car by adding two wheels on the left side!

    4 days ago
    • David, PPT Editor

      A longer barrel does not improve accuracy. Longer barrels improve muzzle velocity and will allow for less drop, but this does not mean it is more accurate. Devices like the Roni improve practical accuracy by giving you another point of contact and makes aiming easier and more steady.

      4 days ago
New to Guns ? Check out our beginners guns video course. Start Now