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6 Best Walther Pistols for Concealed Carry

We take a look at Walther and narrow down which handguns we think you should consider if you're looking for your next concealed carry pistol.

When it comes to concealed carry firearms, Walther is one of the original players in that arena.

They have been making firearms since 1886 and have an extensive history of producing smaller, more easily concealed guns.

Walther PDPs
Despite making some amazing pistols, Walther still seems to fly under the radar of much of the gun community.

This is partly because European views on police firearms, especially in the first half of the 20th century, were a bit different than ours.

They preferred small guns, which led to the creation of the Walther PP series. This gun evolved into the PPK, which helped pave the way for future concealed carry pistols.

Summary of Our Top Picks

  1. Best .22 LR

    Walther P22 Q

    If you prefer a super soft shooting experience, the P22 Q is a .22 LR pistol perfect for the job.

  2. Best .380

    Walther PK380

    Decent .380 model with ambi controls that will work for both right handed and left handed shooters.

  3. Most Nostalgic

    Walther PPK

    If you want to feel like 007, the PPK is the Walther for you.

  4. Best Single Stack CCW

    Walther PPS M2

    Slim, single stack design so it's easy to conceal.

  5. Editor's Pick

    Walther PDP

    The best of the best that Walther has to offer. Perfect for CCW.

Table of Contents

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Behind the Company

In 1780, Matthias Conrad Pistor started a weapons factory, beginning a long family history of gunsmithing. Matthias’s descendant Rosalie Wilhelmine Amalie Pistor married August Theodor Albert Walther, and together, they had a son, Carl Walther.

Carl Wilhelm Freund Walther (Photo: Walther)

Carl Walther would continue the gunsmithing tradition that ran on his mother’s side, eventually founding his own company in 1886 — the Walther we know today.

Walther has produced several firearms, including rifles, shotguns, and handguns, but their bread and butter have always been handguns.

They’ve created a wide variety of pistols, from military and police platforms to specialized Olympic firearms.

Some of their guns, like their SSP-E above, look more akin to a Star-Wars blaster than a target pistol. (Photo: Walther)

Walther has some rather interesting and often underrated guns for concealed carry, and today we are looking at a few handguns from their catalog that we think are excellent options.

Best Walthers for Concealed Carry

1. P22 Q

Using .22 LR for concealed carry and defense is a bit of a toss-up. Rimfire rounds tend to be less reliable and require the user to be selective in their ammunition choices.

Walther P22 Side
The P22 bears a striking resemblance to Walther’s other designs, like the PPQ and CCP.

But for those who may be extremely recoil-sensitive, the Walther P22 Q is a solid choice for concealed carry.

Many .22 LRs aimed at concealed carry are very small and lightweight, making them challenging to shoot effectively.

The Walther P22 is small but is still just big enough to fill your hand with its fantastically ergonomic grip.

Walther P22 Slide and Under Rail
Even though it’s a .22 LR pistol, the P22 still has some niceties, like forward slide serrations and a full accessory rail.

Walther’s new Q model invokes some James Bondness to its name, but more importantly, it adds a slightly different grip surface and stippling, improved reliability, and removed the silly trigger lock design.

Concealed carriers end up with a gun that weighs 16 ounces and is 1.1 inches wide, 6.5 inches long, and 4.5 inches tall. Keeping this weapon concealed isn’t an issue.

The P22 is available in multiple finishes. A threaded model and an integrated laser model are also available.

Shooters will feel hardly any recoil, and the DA/SA trigger has a great single-action pull, making for easy shooting. It’s a very accurate weapon, which is good since shot placement is critical with a .22 LR for self-defense.

If you are looking for a .22 LR that’s not micro-sized, then the newer, improved Walther P22 Q might be for you.

Best .22 LR
299
at EuroOptic

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

You can check out our full review of the Walther P22 here.

2. PK380

Smith and Wesson get a lot of love for releasing the EZ series, but the gun industry seems to have forgotten that Walther did it first.

The Walther PK380 introduced the first pistol specifically designed for those with reduced hand strength. It’s not the smallest .380 ACP on the market, but those smaller guns aren’t always the greatest to shoot.

Although the PK380 is a bit older, the ergonomics and overall design feel still hold up well against modern pistols. (Photo: Lynx Defense)

This gun comes in at 1.2 inches wide, 6.1 inches long, and 5.2 inches tall. While it is somewhat larger compared to other .380s, its size makes it much easier to shoot.

Walther took a page from their P99 and created a comfy, rounded grip that helps improve control and dissipate recoil — making follow-up shots faster and easier.

The PK380 is available in an even wider variety of colors than the P22. (Photo: Buffalo’s Outdoors)

Left-handed shooters will feel at home with the PK380 thanks to its ambidextrous controls, which include a paddle-type magazine release and slide-mounted safety.

You also get a DA/SA trigger system that is notably better than the P22 Q.

Sadly, the gun lacks a slide release and requires a tool to take it apart, which can be a hassle. But if you can get past those downsides, the PK380 offers a small but capable handgun for all ages and hand types.

Best .380
449
at Gunprime

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

3. PPK

James Bond made the PPK famous and Walther a household name, so of course, I had to include it.

The Walther PPK is a pint-sized .380 ACP and is one of the original pocket pistols. This little gun has been in production since 1931. And like a good pair of shoes, it’s both practical and stylish.

Although the PPK hasn’t always been the gun that James Bond uses, it is by far the most iconic and well-recognized one.

Walther’s PPK is blowback operated, and previous chamberings include .25 ACP, .32 ACP, and 9mm Ultra, but current production is isolated to .380 ACP and .22 LR.

The K in PPK stands for Kriminal, as it was originally designed for use by Germany’s Kriminalamt, or Crime Investigation unit. This plainclothes unit carried these guns in a mostly concealed fashion.

As if it wasn’t already oozing with good looks and swagger, the engraved 90th anniversary model of the PPK is even more gorgeous.

To this day, the gun still serves very well as a concealed pistol. It’s small and slick with a near snag-proof design that ensures an easy and smooth draw, especially when carried in a deep concealment method.

Although some may consider.380 ACP anemic, with the right ammo, it can meet the modern standard necessary for self-defense.

Walther PPK/s
Easily confused with the regular PPK, the PPK/s combines the shorter barrel of the PPK with the longer grip of the Walther PP. You could almost consider it a precursor to guns like the Glock 19X and Sig P365X, which have similar configurations.

Unfortunately, there are some downsides to the PPK. The blowback increases the felt recoil, which can be described as harsh. Its rough double-action trigger pull clocks in at anywhere 13-17 pounds! Also, six rounds might not feel like enough in a world with high-capacity micro-compacts.

It might be showing its age, but if you want to dress up and have a gun to match, the PPK will get it done with style.

Most Nostalgic
749
at Palmetto State Armory

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

You can check out our full review of the Walther PPK here.

4. CCP M2

CCP stands for Concealed Carry Pistol and is Walther’s second, much better-marketed attempt at producing a concealable, easy-to-handle handgun.

Walther CCP M2
While it may look like many of Walther’s other pistols on the outside, it is definitely different on the inside.

The Walther CCP takes some of the same features of the PK380 and puts them on a slightly more modern platform.

I highly suggest the newer M2 model over the original, as it is much easier to take the gun apart and doesn’t require a tool and three hands to do so.

This is yet another design that allows people of any skill level to easily manipulate the handgun.

Walther CCP M2
The fixed barrel is visible here, as well as the gas piston attached to the front of the slide.

Walther used what they call Soft-Coil technology. It’s a gas-operated delayed blowback technology that uses a small port in the barrel to delay the opening of the slide, similar to the HK P7. This system takes a good bite out of the gun’s recoil and makes the slide very easy to rack.

Once you start shooting, the soft-coil system works exceptionally well. It does a great job of reducing the gun’s recoil and makes it a real kitten. Walther ensured the gun was small enough to conceal but large enough to shoot and handle without much difficulty.

The CCP M2 (bottom) feels like a scaled-down Walther PPQ (top). It is extremely comfortable in the hand as a result.

It comes in at 1.18 inches wide, with a height of 5.12 inches and an overall length of 6.41 inches. Whether you opt for the 9mm or .380 ACP version, the gun has a standard capacity of 8 rounds.

The CCP might be a little bit outdated, but it is still a viable option for those with less hand strength or those who just want a soft-shooting ergonomic pistol. Plus, it’s surprisingly affordable.

Available Coupons

If you want more details, head to our review here.

5. PPS M2

Smith and Wesson gets a lot of praise for jump-starting the thin single stack 9mm craze with the Shield, but the Walther PPS M1 came out in 2007 and was another great early example of a slim, single stack 9mm.

Heck, my wife stole mine and made it her gun because it’s so easy to carry.

Long before the S&W Shield and the Glock 43, the PPS quietly entered the market of ultra-slim sub-compact 9’s. (Photo: Gun Digest)

The PPS M2 is an Americanized version of the original PPS. The grip was redesigned to be less 2×4-like and more ergonomic. Walther also ditched the paddle magazine release in favor of a more standard push-button design.

At 1 inch thick, with a height of 4.4 inches and an overall length is 6.3 inches, the PPS M2 keeps things trim and easily concealed.

The PPS is notably smaller than Walther’s compact PDP. (Photo: Handgun Hero)

You can use a 6-round flush-fitting magazine, a slightly extended 7-round magazine with a pinky extension, and an even longer eight-round magazine.

Walther did a crazy high undercut trigger guard to let your hand get nice and high on the gun. The trigger is a crisp striker-fired design that features a little take-up but a clean break and a positive reset.

The PPS M2 even has a model that comes with a Shield RSMc optic preinstalled. In fact, it was one of the first concealed carry-oriented firearms to incorporate a red dot from the factory.

(Photo: Shooting Sports USA)

A big downside is that newer micro-compacts offer a few extra rounds compared to the PPS M2.

But if you can make do with eight rounds, the PPS M2 remains a classy carry gun designed to maximize ergonomics and concealment.

Best Single Stack CCW
369
at Gunprime

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

6. Walther PDP Compact

Walther took their successful PPQ and improved it based on customer feedback to create the PDP. Their goal was to create a pistol around the use of a red dot sight.

Walther PDP Compact Solo
The PDP Compact is a favorite among the Pew Pew Tactical staff.

The ergonomics were designed to ensure you can easily and quickly pick up the dot and get it on target. Beyond just being an excellent optics-ready gun, the PDP Compact has all the hallmarks of good Walther design.

The ergonomics are absolutely brilliant and greet your hand like it’s made for it. You can get an excellent grip, and with interchangeable backstraps, you can ensure it comfortably fits your hand size.

The new PDP-F, shown in front, is a great option for those who are interested in the platform but want things a bit more trimmed.

Much like the PPQ, the PDP’s trigger is super smooth and very lightweight, which allows you to make excellent use of a red dot for those fast and accurate shots. It is arguably the best striker-fired trigger currently on the market.

With a 4-inch barrel, the PDP Compact model is roughly Glock 19 size. It may not be as easy to conceal as some of the smaller options, but if you prefer a bigger, more capable gun, then the PDP Compact is a fantastic choice.

Best Compact 9mm Pistol
649
at EuroOptic

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

Additionally, Walther has recently released the PDP-F, which is aimed at people with smaller hands. It features a smaller grip front-to-back for reduced grip-to-trigger reach and is available in 3.5 and 4-inch versions.

649
at Firearms Depot

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Available Coupons

Be sure to check out our full reviews of the PDP compact and the PDP-F, or watch our video reviews below.

Final Thoughts

Fine European firearms are aplenty in the United States. While Glock and Sig enjoy a large share of the market, companies like Walther and CZ seem to attract more of a personalized fanbase.

A cult following, if you will.

If you haven’t considered a Walther, you should at least look into them. The ergonomics alone may convert you.

Walther has always made some top-tier firearms, and if you are in the market for a concealed-carry gun, any of the above should treat you exceptionally well.

Are there any Walther fans out there? Let us know in the comments below! Not completely sold on a Walther? Check out our article on the 12 Best Concealed Carry Guns (By Caliber)!

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5 Leave a Reply

  • Commenter Avatar
    FelixF

    My wife swiped my PPS M2 also. And won't give it back. It's OK though. I now carry a Sig P365XL. I can shoot more lead down range, but she is a better shot and doesn't need 15 + 1....

    December 21, 2022 6:27 pm
  • Commenter Avatar
    Royk

    I can't wait to get a PDP. I picked up a PPQ .45 and it shoots like a dream. The trigger is awesome.

    December 19, 2022 1:16 pm
  • Commenter Avatar
    Mike

    I own a PDP 4.5 full size with Holosun 507c green dot and Olight balder s mini. LIFE IS GOOD

    December 18, 2022 6:20 pm
  • Commenter Avatar
    Chuck Cochran

    I'm a bit of a Walther fan, owning several. My PPK/S, I carried for 25 years, until my aging eyes retired it die to difficulty picking up the sights in Low Light Drills. I'll carry my PPQ M2 in .40bS&W during the Winter months.
    My Son, a LEO, carries his PPS M2 as his Off Duty CC Gun.
    I've not tried the new PDP yet. Another Gun purchase on my fixed income in this economy is doubtful. The PDP uses the same trigger as the PPQ, and is hands down, the best stock trigger on the market. Beats all other stock gun triggers on the market.

    December 18, 2022 6:08 pm
  • Commenter Avatar
    Weston Cecil

    Walter is my preferred carry pistol. I have several by my EDC is the PPQ Q4. The threaded barrel is a slight hassle for CCW. However those range days when you can throw on the Ghost-M by dead air make the extra hassle worth it. Walter makes quality guns and I never understand why they don’t get the fandom of sig or S&W. Walter is a premier builder at value prices in my opinion.

    December 18, 2022 5:13 pm
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