Best Gun Oil & Grease [2019]: Lube it Up!

Gun oil is a necessary, but often mystifying and perplexing part of owning a firearm.  

Some will say you should never ever use such-and-such.  Others will tell you only idiots use anything but such-and-such.

We know it’s confusing.  We’re here to help.

I'm from the internet meme
You’re in good hands here folks.

We tested, evaluated, and finally narrowed down the best gun oils and lubricants out there.  We’re going to go over everything we learned, and maybe drop a little knowledge about the whole thing along the way.

Curious about what we found?  

Need some help picking the best gun oils and lubricants?  (Gun lubricants, that is.  This isn’t that type of site).

By the end you’ll know everything about gun oil…and the best one for you.

If you’re looking for all-in-one kits…check out Best Gun Cleaning Kits where we got the most popular ones and put them through the test.

All Gun Cleaning Kits
All Gun Cleaning Kits

Table of Contents

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Why You Need Gun Oil

Modern firearms, especially combat-focused ones, can run for a really long time without any maintenance at all, but that doesn’t mean you should.

could-should
This goes for cloning dinosaurs as well.

You wouldn’t drive your car for tens of thousands of miles without an oil change, and you wouldn’t let your house become too filthy to live in.

Just like your car, your gun needs an oil change every so often too, and just like your house, you have to clean things up when it gets dirty.

For the full rundown on cleaning say, an AR-15, be sure to check out our guide to get an idea of how the whole process goes.

This is the same process you’ll use for all your firearms, it’s just the disassembly and where you lube will be different from one gun to another. (Be sure to check your owner’s manual for the disassembly procedure and recommended lubrication points of your specific firearm).  We also have a general cleaning and lubrication guide for firearms if you need a refresher.

Cleaning PAP M92
Cleaning PAP M92

Basically, you start with a solvent to break everything loose, then a wire bore brush to scrub everything out, then follow up with some more solvent to make sure everything is cleaned, followed by some sort of protectant.

I know, it’s a pain to clean your guns, especially if you shoot often, but it really is something that will extend the life of your firearms, and will keep them working when you need them most.

Need to clean your Glock? We got you covered there too!

Remington 870 needs a scrub down? John can help with that!

Types of Gun Lubes and Cleaning Products

Now, there are a few different types of gun oils/lubes/solvents out there.

First, you have dedicated products that do just one job, such as a dedicated solvent or a dedicated oil.

Then you have three-in-one products that act as solvent, protective oil, and lubrication all in one.

Traditional wisdom says to avoid these products where possible, as most three-in-one products tend to either not offer the corrosion and rust protection of a traditional oil, or they tend to run.

While that is true, and like most things a “do it all” product isn’t going to be as good as a product that has one job it does well, most modern CLP (Clean, Lube, Protect) products will work just fine for the average shooter, especially when combined with another product here or there.

After the triple-action CLP products that do it all, you have dedicated oils like the famous and beloved (for good reason) Hoppe’s #9 oils that are just for lubricating.

Hoppe's 9
Again, I cannot stress enough that this is just for firearms and other mechanical devices.

These oils, when combined with a proper solvent, are an excellent way to protect and lubricate your firearm.

They’re also…kinda expensive.  You can get by with regular ole motor oil in a pinch, or if you want something cheap.  In fact, I know of at least a few high-speed, low-drag operator types in the military and professional door-kickers in law enforcement who all swear by 5W-20 motor oil.

Now, these are people running M4’s and actual honest-to-God machine guns with at least the capability of full-auto fire, so they’re not exactly what I’d call typical users, but if that sort of thing matters to you, it’s worth noting.  

It also means that if you’re ever stuck in the zombie apocalypse and have to keep your rusty, trusty SHTF rifle running, you can get by on some good ole motor oil from your zombified neighbors minivan.

off-road minivan
I’m just assuming that unless your minivan looks like this, you aren’t making it past day three of the zombie apocalypse.  Sorry.

Grease is the final option for keeping your firearm from frictioning itself to death, and it’s another option for keeping your firearm running smoothly.  

It’s a bit thicker than your typical oils, and it can attract grime if you’re not careful which will, of course, make your gun run worse, but it can also last a very long time, and it doesn’t tend to run like some of the thinner oils out there.

That’s because most grease is just a thickened oil with some kind of polymer or silicone added to it to help it not attract dust, dirt, and carbon and to improve lubricity (yes its a real word).

A good example of gun-centric grease would be Tetra Gun 004B11.

tetra
This 1 oz package would last you quite a while.

Three-In-One versus Oil versus Grease

So, which one is the best?  

Like most things, it comes down to preference and what trade-offs you’re willing to accept.  In general, there are pros and cons whichever way you go.

In the end, whatever you use is probably fine, especially if it seems to work for you.

I know you probably came here expecting me to tell you to use this product with that product, and then maybe chant this one particular Latin phrase over the gun, and then it would run for a thousand years.

And there’s a shit ton of people out there who will tell you that this product or that product or this other product is the undisputed best thing out there, and it only costs *some totally unreasonable amount*.

In the end, you have to decide what you’re looking for, and how much effort vs cost you’re willing to accept.

Are you looking for one product that may very well last you a lifetime and will probably do everything you need it to, even if it won’t do it as well as other, more expensive products?  Get a can of Ballistol or Break-Free CLP, call it a day.

Ballistol In Use
Ballistol In Use

If you’re prepping for the apocalypse or otherwise have a bunch of firearms you want to bury in the desert and dig up in working order later (I’m not here to judge, but this is in no way meant to be legal advice) go with a nice grease.

Are you an average shooter who wants to spend a little more to take the best care of your gun?  Maybe start with a solvent, a dedicated lubricating oil, and then wipe the gun down with a good protective oil.

Remember, you’re very unlikely to ruin a gun with any relatively sane thing you put on it, you just might find it doesn’t get as clean, or it develops a bit of surface rust, or it gums up faster.  In that case, change up what you’re doing.

Try new things.  

Look for a better way of doing things.  I think you’ll find that the people with the best setups are the ones that are constantly changing what they do and using the best products on the market, not the guys that heard you should only use Ballistol back in the 60’s and ran with that knowledge like it was the one true path to firearms Nirvana.  

Sidenote: Don’t Google “Firearms Nirvana” without thinking like I did. It…gets really dark.

In short, try a few things, spend a little too much money, and figure out what you like best, and what works best with your level of gun use and abuse, and your budget.

Now if you need a place to start your search, here’s where you should be looking.

Best Traditional Gun Oil

These products are dedicated lubricants specifically designed for firearms use.  

Does that really mean anything?

I dunno.  Nobody does.  There’s a lot of marketing hocus pocus surrounding everything firearms related, but especially gun oil, which isn’t regulated like motor oil and machine oil.  They don’t have to really test it and put meaningful numbers on the bottle for you.

snake oil
Lots of gun oil is more snake oil than anything I’d put on a firearm.

Not to say there aren’t excellent products out there.  Products like…

Hoppe’s #9 Lubricating Oil

Good ole Hoppe’s #9 (pronounced “hops” for those unfamiliar) is always going to be a part of the conversation when you start talking about gun oils, and for good reason.

Editor's Pick
10
at Amazon

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

This old standby is great for lubricating and protecting your firearm, and it won’t gum, harden, or evaporate unless you bake it in a kiln.  Protip: don’t bake your gun in a kiln.  Especially if you’re a GLOCK owner.

melted glock
No, I don’t know why they did it, I just know that it’s not a good idea.

The only problem with it is it may run a little bit, but the precision applicator on most bottles means that you’ll have an easier time putting it just where you want it.  Also, it smells a little, which may be a good or bad thing.

Honorable Mention: If you don’t like the smell, I suggest the synthetic version.

Best Three-In-One Gun Oil

Three-in-one gun oils are for the shooter that is just looking to spend as little time cleaning and as much time shooting as possible.  If you’re looking for one product that does it all, you’re in luck because that’s exactly what these products do.

Break-Free CLP

If Hoppe’s #9 is the standard for oils, Break-Free CLP is the standard for 3-in-1s.  This stuff will do it all, and do it well, from cleaning fouling from the inside of the gun, to protecting a variety of surface materials from rust and corrosion.  It’s available in an aerosol spray and in wipes that you can find below. 

7
at Brownells

Prices accurate at time of writing

Prices accurate at time of writing

Best of all, it works at any sane temperature without gumming or hardening, so no worries about using it a gun that gets hot under rapid fire.

Finally, it’s been used by militaries around the world for decades, so it’s got a pretty good rep and has been literally battle-tested in some truly inhospitable places.

What’s your take on Break-Free?

Readers' Ratings

4.89/5 (217)

Your Rating?

Honorable Mention: Ballistol.  The only problem with Ballistol is that it isn’t a copper or lead solvent, so it may leave tiny bits of either in the rifling of your barrel, requiring a dedicated solvent for those things.  It is non-toxic (unlike Break-Free) and just as battle-proven however.

Best Gun Grease

I’ll be honest, I don’t like gun grease unless I’m putting a firearm away for a long time, but there’s something to be said for a product that can keep a firearm running for a long time in the field, and under really adverse conditions.  

Mil-Comm TW25B Gun Grease

So, if you’re walking off into the bush or are an operator operating operationally in some capacity, or just want a product you don’t have to reapply often (even if you should) Mil-Comm TW25B is for you.  It also costs about $20 an ounce, so make sure you know what you’re getting into.

This formulation has the approval of US/NATO forces, and is found anywhere firearms have to keep running, no matter what.

TW25B 1.5 oz
TW25B 1.5 oz

Honorable Mention: Now, if you’re a more sane individual and you want a grease that doesn’t require a second mortgage, Tetra Gun 004B1 is about $5 per ounce and is going to be just as good in almost every possible real-world application, but I did say “best” grease, so we had to talk about the Mil-Comm stuff first.

Parting Shots

That about does it for this one.  Remember, you’re very, very, very unlikely to really screw up your gun if you just read the package directions for what you’re using, so feel free to experiment a little.  Find what works best for you.

Got any thoughts about gun oil? What’s your preferred product? Let me know in the comments below! Want more? Check out our picks for Best Gun Cleaning Kits.

38 Leave a Reply

  • Matt

    G96 is the best, and best smelling CLP. GREAT stuff. Also, be careful what you use to clean certain lined barrels with.

    1 second ago
  • Ol'salt

    Has anyone ever tried Boeshield T-9? It is by far the best anti corrosion lube for extremely salty areas. I use it on some pretty expensive boats but never tried it on a gun. I have compared it side by side with a ton of marine sprays and non work like it for corrosion prevention. I just do t want to experiment on my firearms.

    3 months ago
  • Paul

    Carburetor cleaner for bore scrubbing. Then Lube with motor oil. Lite touch of clear heavy duty grease. On slide rails on bore in places where it touches the slide. And that is it. Do not invent things that worked. Gun is a tool, it is not your d..ck to lube it whole day long.

    5 months ago
  • Joshua Barker

    Battleborn grease is pretty good and one small jar lasts a long time.

    6 months ago
  • Johnny Invisible

    I clean with Kano Kroil and Hoppe's #9 in a 50/50 mix. Air compressor blowgun to remove left over solvents. Rubber gloves and eye protection necessary. Lubricate with Mil-Comm MC2500 oil and TW25B grease. Besides their synthetic components Mil-Comm's "magic ingredient" is teflon which bonds to the metal surfaces and provides lubrication even when dry. Note: MC2500 has less teflon and is thinner than MC3500. MC3500 is midway between a grease and an oil and again has less teflon than their TW25B grease. After finding Mil-Comm products, I now use my left over Break Free CLP for automotive and yard tools. You can also mix one part TW25B grease four parts 99% isopropyl alcohol is a spray bottle. Give is a shake each time you use it and generously spray it into hard to reach places. The alcohol quickly evaporates leaving a thin coating of the protective grease behind. This is not my idea. It was posted on Mil-Comm's old website. They also suggested using straight 99% alcohol for cleaning, and it works well, especially for nasty 22LR's. Since the 99% alcohol has NO lubrication or protective properties, the freshly cleaned metal is vulnerable to rust or corrosion. It is IMPERATIVE to follow up with the grease/alcohol spray and further lubrication.

    10 months ago
  • Fred

    No, it's not prounced "hops." Call the company and ask them, doofus.

    11 months ago
    • Mike

      Even if you’re right, does name calling solve anything?

      1 month ago
  • Drew

    What about a solvent recommendation? You did lubricant, 3-in-1, and grease. I think we’re missing other starting points for the protectants you mentioned as well.

    1 year ago
  • Leo

    Don't use Tetra products it has a bad reaction when exposed to salt. Guns have rusted in as little as two hours from my sweat.

    1 year ago
  • Chris

    "Good ole Hoppe’s #9 (pronounced “hops” for those unfamiliar)[...]" It's actually pronounced HOP-eez. I wondered myself until I watched a couple of their videos on YouTube.

    1 year ago
    • overdriver999

      youre right..i never would have thought that until i watched the Hoppe's youtube channel...i always corrected ppl and swore it was pronounced "hops"...i stand corrected and now i know..thanks!

      10 months ago
  • Ken in Dallas

    The article makes no mention of air temperature. Lubricants perform differently at different temperatures. Some freeze; some run. And a firearm is like any other machine: If it spins, oil it; if it slides; grease it. No mention is made of which ingredient dissolves lead and which copper. Snake oil never says what it contains. If you're going to stake your life on a firearm, you want to know what you're lubing it with - no? The Internet is full of people who make claims for this and that, so I won't claim to have the answers, but you need to do the work and find them for these questions and a few others.

    1 year ago
  • Chad Carroll

    WHAT NONE OF YOU INCLUDING THE AUTHUR GETS IS THE FACT THAT ALL THESE RECOMMENDATIONS ARE COMPLETELY A WASTE OF MONEY BESIDES THE DEDICATED SOLVENTS ONLY. AUTHOR STATES HE DOESN'T KNOW AND NOBODY KNOWS WHAT TYPE TO USE. THAT IS INCORRECT, FACTUALLY INCORRECT!! I'M HERE TO DISPELL THE BULLSHIT SURROUNDING THIS TOPIC. ALL YOU WANT IS SIMPLE PLAIN OLE LAXATIVE OIL (MINERAL OIL) YES THE STUFF THAT MAKE YOU SHIT!! THE OIL THAT'S SAFE INSIDE YOUR BODY AND OUTSIDE YOUR BODY. THE OIL THAT COST A FEW BUCKS AT WAL MART OR ANY WHERE ELSE AND 1 BOTTLE WILL LAST FOR YEARS ALL AT A FEW BUCKS. THAT IS THE BASIS FOR EVERY OTHER OIL OUT HERE. I'VE ONLY BEEN USING MINERAL OIL FOR 25 YEARS. I'VE USED OTHERS AND NONE DO BETTER THAN PLAIN MINERAL OIL. IT'S WHAT THE MANUFACTORER USES. IT'S WHAT HOPPES LUBE OIL IS WITH PERFUME. THAT'S IT PEOPLE. THIS IS NOT A SECRET OR SOMEONE LOOKING FOR SOME SPECIAL SAUCE. I'M NOT KIDDING YOU PEOPLE. I HAVE A METALLURGY BACKGROUND AND I DO KNOW WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT.. HERE'S WHAT YOU NEED TO DO FROM HERE ON OUT UNTIL YOU ARE DEAD. GETS SOME GOOD FLANNEL CLOTH AND CUT IT INTO 20 INCH OR SO SQUARES, TAKE A COUPLE TABLESPOONS AND DOUSE THE NEWLY CUT CLOTH YOU'VE CUT WITH PINKING SHEARS AND GET YOURSELF A PLASTIC ZIP LOCK BAG AND ALLOW IT TO DISPERSE INTO THE CLOTH INSIDE THE BAG OVER A FEW HOURS AND BOOM YOU'VE GOT YOUR PROTECTIVE RAG. SIMPLY REAPPLY OIL TO THE RAG OVER TIME WHEN IT FINALLY GETS DRY. WIPE DOWN YOUR "METAL" GUNS AND GUN PARTS WHEN YOU ARE ABOUT TO PUT THEM AWAY AND THAT IS ALL YOU HAVE TO DO FOR PROTETECTIVE MEASURES. ANOTHER TRICK ON THE SOLVENT CLEANING SIDE IS USING MINERAL SPIRITS FOR CLEANING. HOPPES 9 SOLVENT IS OK TO USE IN THE BARREL, BUT PARTS CLEANING ETC SHOULD BE DONE WITH PLAIN CHEAP OLE MINERAL SPIRITS (PAINT THINNER, BUT USE MINERAL SPIRITS AS ITS CHEAPER AND LESS STINKY) WITH A TOOTH BRUSH OR A BRASS BRUSH. THIS IS ALL YOU NEED. NOT WHAT THE AUTHUR SAID ABOUT CONSTANTY CHANGING WITH THE BEST PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET WHATEVER THAT NONSENSE MEANS. YES, THE GUYS IN THE 60'S THAT ARE PROBABLY USING MINERAL OIL ARE RIGHT. THAT COULD BE CALLED THE BEST TRADITIONAL GUN OIL. SIDENOTE I WAS BORN IN THE 80'S. THIS IS METAL WE ARE TALKING ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT WILL NEVER CHANGE ABOUT GUNS THEY ARE ALWAYS JUST METAL AND YOU ARE JUST PROTECTING METAL NOT GUNS, METAL!! TO HELL WITH THE BEST PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET. THESE PRODUCTS ARE BASED WITH MINERAL OIL AND HAVE SOME PERFUME IN THEM AND SUDDENLY ITS HOPPES LUBE OR THIS OR THAT!! I HATE THE MYSTERY AROUND THIS TOPIC. IT'S SO SIMPLE REALLY. LEAVE THE MARKET ALONE. THEY ONLY EXIST TO TAKE YOUR MONEY FROM YOU AND HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER YOU THAT MINERAL OIL AND MINERAL SPIRITS CANT GIVE YOU. ALWAYS REMEMBER GUN METALS ARE SO HARD, UNBELIEVABLY HARD AND THAT FRICTION IS NEVER THE ISSUE. THE PARTS WILL RIDE TO TOGETHER FOREVER AND BURNISH (MARRYING OF PARTS ETC). SOME PARTS WILL WEAR OVER TIME AND LOOSEN UP BUT THEY DIDN'T WEAR BECAUSE THEY DIDNT HAVE OIL FLOWING THROUGH THEM. DO NOT SOAK YOUR GUNS IN OIL PEOPLE. ONLY KEEP A MICROSCOPIC FILM ON THE METAL PARTS ONLY. ALUMINUM DOESN'T NEED PROTECTING SO KEEPS THE OIL AWAY. WE DON'T NEED OIL EVERY WHERE ACCUMULATING DUST, DIRT ETC CAUSING AN ABRASIVE PASTE THAT WILL ACTUALLY WEAR THE PARTS. THAT IS ALL THAT IS NEEDED FOR THE PROTECTION OF THEM. ON AR FAMILY RIFLES YES IT'S OK TO USE ENOUGH TO PREVENT THE PARTS FROM FREEZING ETC BUT NOT TO MUCH. I PERSONLLY USE A 27 GAUGE SYRINGE NEEDLE THAT I CUT THE TIP OFF OF IT TO PREVENT STABBING AND A SYRINGE FULL OF MINERAL OIL FOR PRECISE APPLICATIONS LIKE ON EVERY TYPE OF FIREARM MECHANISM POSSIBLE. THIS IS GOOD TO CONCENTRATE THE OIL INTO A CERTAIN AREA ONLY TO PREVENT IT FROM GETTING EVERYWHERE.. IVE BEEN USING THE SAME SYRINGE AND NEEDLE FOR 12 YEARS ON ALL MY COUNTLESS NUMBER OF GUNS. THE WHOLE USING MOTOR OIL FALLACY IS JUST SOMETHING PEOPLE DO TO SATISFY THERE BELIEF SYSTEMS. THEY THINK MACHINE GUNS ARE LIKE CAR PARTS THAT NEED OIL FLOWING THROUGH THEM AND THAT'S JUST BULLSHIT THINKING. I HAVE A MACHINE GUN AND I KEEP IT AS DRY AS POSSIBLE WITH ONLY WHATS NEEDED WITH MINERAL OIL. JUST USE MINERAL OIL WHERE NEEDED IT'S JUST THAT SIMPLE PEOPLE. PLEASE BELIEVE WHAT I'M TELLING YOU. IF YOU INSTITUTE THESE PROCESSES YOU WILL FIND THAT IT NOT ONLY WORKS BUT WILL SAVE YOU SO MUCH DAMN TIME AND MONEY. I HAVE NOTHING TO GAIN FROM THIS OTHER THAN GETTING PEOPLE TO STOP FOLLOWING THE GUN OIL MARKET.

    1 year ago
    • Drew

      So what do you use for a solvent then? He doesn’t mention any that aren’t 3-in-1.

      1 year ago
  • Henry E.

    Anything Lucas oil makes, I've had great luck with. Their CLP is top notch, high Timken rating on gun grease, and their oil in the needle tip bottle allows for precise application. Last I heard it's what Sig uses in their factory and my Sig 516 came boxed with a sample pack of the oil.

    1 year ago
  • Jeff

    Gotta give the nod to M-Pro 7 products. I've used many different oils, lubes and greases to found M-Pro to work great!

    1 year ago
  • Lorenzo

    M-Pro 7 Cleaning Kit from Eric's article on Best Gun Cleaning Kits is the best one I've used. It has both the M-Pro 7 Cleaner and Oil in the kit along with the brushes. It's my favorite cleaning and lubricating kit of all time.

    1 year ago
    • Eric Hung

      Thanks Lorenzo...it's what I take in my large range bag!

      1 year ago
  • G Willackers

    Kano KROIL........I can't believe nobody has mentioned it.

    1 year ago
  • jim

    Mr Collins, I love your sassy and humorous writing style.. Thanks for helping make pew pew entertaining as well as informative

    1 year ago
  • Leigh

    Ive Found Lanox works well for most guns has lanolin which is good for protection and also as a lube also water resistant dont over use it but is also good for your wood stock allways wipe off excess comes in a spray like WD 40

    1 year ago
  • Craig Hunter

    A huge fan of your write-ups, please keep them coming. I like to use Ballistol or a good 3-in-1 to clean the average range day fouling, followed by a rub of some fantastic oil I have found made by Aquila in South Africa. Grew up with Ballistol and the smell takes me back to childhood and army days very quickly, but it costs a bit to be using every week, so I alternate with the 3-in-1. On the Aquila oil I bought a second hand rusted rifle once and a scrub with steel wool and that oil restored it to brand new condition in no time. All my guns go to sleep with that oil on since then.

    1 year ago
  • SJaggard

    i just use birchwood grease on sliding and Rem oil on everything else and shoot a lot so I don’t tear down every time-sprey n clean what I can reach then more thoural once a week or so- I find myself running more and more wet - is there any downside to running really wet ?

    1 year ago
    • Chad Carroll

      Yes, it's a terrible idea to run guns soaking wet. You are creating an abrasive paste being dust, dirt etc that will cause the parts to detoriate overy time. FACT! Keep the gun dry!!!! Only a microscopic level of protection is needed for the most part and if you need oil to prevent freezing of parts only use mineral oil. READ my reply above to this article.

      1 year ago
  • Chris Jar-Head

    Absolutely fantastic article. As mentioned; it's all about what your experience is and what works best for you. As a side note, back in the late '90s when there was relative worldwide peace (i.e. no huge troop deployments), my 81's platoon used Diet Coke to clean the Mortar Tubes. The U.S.M.C.'s budet at that time was about ten cents a year (there was somewhat serious talk about disbanding the Corps at that time), so cleaning supplies were no existent. For lube / protectant before we turned the systems back into the armory, I remember vaguely we used one Marine's Canola Oil that he used to cook is own meals with this really tiny electric stove in the barracks.

    1 year ago
  • Notalima

    TW25B grease for your AK pattern rifles all day. Works fantastic. I'm not an operator operating operationally, but Safariland CLP has done yeoman's work for the last few decades for me for my pistols and AR-pattern rifles. Hotter hell desert, cold ass Flagstaff winters, it just works. I've tried a handful of 'wonder oils', and outside of M=Pro7, I've not really been impressed with one or more qualities in each one tried. Dries out too fast this one, too gummy that one, cakes up this one, works like crap on suppressed applications that one (big thing since I shoot a lot of suppressed range days) Gunzilla is next on the 'try it out' list, however.

    1 year ago
  • PFJ

    Tube of Mobile SHC grease, quart Mobile synthetic 5w20 and bottle of Hoppes solvent, The tube and quart will last a life time of weapon lubing.and get them at Walmart for chump change. Much cheaper than buying 1oz tubes of oil. Scam. A bag of qtips and some bristle brushes and old cut up T-shirts good to go. Air compressor is not necessary but is a huge help. Wear glasses or goggles.

    1 year ago
  • Mark Wynn

    I too, try stuff ... and currently like, for pistols anyway, Hoppe's Elite Foaming Gun Cleaner and Remington Rem Dri-lube. Non messy, non-toxic, both work great ... and don't attract crud. The teflon dri-lube is light, but I clean and lube after every range visit so I feel it protects adequately.

    1 year ago
  • Charlie Hector

    Slip2000 Slip EWL

    1 year ago
  • Gary Wolff

    I like Gunzilla, I use it on all my firearms.Been using it for years now

    1 year ago
  • DON MINIET

    For basic cleaning "Hoppe's Elite" works great, but for lube "Militec-1" is my weapon of choice! First thing I do with a new gun is take it totally apart and strip all the oils and grease with brake cleaner or acetone; any good degreaser, then brush on Militec on all metal parts,Take a blow dryer and heat the parts, then brush on more oil, then I take compressed air and blow the oil in every nook and cranny. Heat again then wipe off excess. Reassemble lubing as normal with Militec. After this cleaning is a snap; nothing stick and many times all you have to do is wipe it down and re-lube normally,

    1 year ago
  • Matt

    G96 all the way!

    1 year ago
  • Chris S

    What about the old Ed's red formula for gun cleaning and lubrication? Or in a pinch, how about kerosene or automatic transmission fluid for lubrication, two of the ingredients in Ed's Red. Has anybody ever actually looked at the ingredients or the safety data sheet of Hoppe's number 9? The ingredients might be eerily familiar if you've ever made Ed's Red.

    1 year ago
  • Bruce W

    Nope. Best 3 in 1 is G96. Smells great and can be used as a man's body spray. Chicks will love it. Oh, and never had a problem with using it on guns.

    1 year ago
    • Matt

      Amen! Been using it since the 80s. Never a problem. Love it!

      1 year ago
      • Mark Wynn

        ... on you or guns?

        1 year ago
  • barry

    anyone have any experience with shooter lube? i bought a bottle of their oil and cleaner and put it on my poly80 glock, but i am not so sure i see a difference between this and some other oil

    1 year ago
  • 7seasdiver

    At the risk of creating a firestorm of hate mail, shooting is one of my hobbies, but not my only one. I also build clocks and work on old clocks. Hoppe's GunMedic is the absolute best product anywhere for cleaning and un-gumming clock movements that haven't run for years. Hoppe's #9 is the go-to for lubricating clock movements. Heresay, I know, but just saying . . . .

    1 year ago
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